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20
MAR

Feeding Baby

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Feeding Baby
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It can be difficult to know what, when, and how much to feed your growing bundle of joy. In terms of amounts, babies are born with a beautiful sense to self-regulate intake, but to ensure you’re not underfeeding or overfeeding it always helps to follow guidelines. See chart and descriptions below for a bit of help. And remember, breastfeeding is a personal decision and can continue for as long or as briefly as you and your baby feel is right, though most doctors recommend breastfeeding for at least the first 6 months.

*To estimate by weight: An average baby should consume 2-3 ounces of formula per day for every pound of his or her body weight, up to a maximum of 32 ounces. So a newborn who weighs 7 lbs will require between 14-21 ounces per day, while a four-month-old who weighs 14 lbs will require between 28-32 ounces.

Birth to 4 Months (Breast Milk or Formula Only)

0 to 3 weeks
  • 1/2-1 oz. increasing to 4 oz. every 2-3 hours about 8 times a day (12-24 oz.)
3 Weeks to 4 Months
  • 4-6 oz. every 3-4 hours about 6 times a day (24-32 oz.)
  • The wee one’s digestive tract is still developing, so keep all feedings liquid. No solids yet.
  • Rooting reflex, a reflex seen in newborn babies causing them to automatically turn their face toward the stimulus and make sucking movements, helps your baby find nourishment organically.
4 to 6 Months

For Liquids (breast milk or formula)
  • 5-7 oz. every 4-5 hours about 5 times a day (24-36 oz.)
For Solids (liquid-soaked rice cereal, later try adding grain cereals)
  • Start with mixing 1 teaspoon dry iron-fortified rice cereal with 4 to 5 teaspoons breast milk or formula. Little by little thicken mixture by increasing to 1 tablespoon dry cereal combined with breast milk or formula. Mixture should be fed twice a day.
  • Remember not to prop the bottle as little ones can often choke this way. And though there are even propping devices sold, feeding time should be bonding time. Try to simulate breastfeeding rituals even if bottle feeding. Look into baby’s eyes, stoke their back, create an intimate space.
  • Use a pacifier if baby just wants to suck.

6 to 9 Months

For Liquids (breast milk or formula)
  • 7-8 oz. about every 6 hours approximately 4 times a day (24-32 oz.)
For Solids (iron-fortified cereals, pureed or strained fruits and vegetables)
  • 3 to 9 tablespoons cereal given over 2 to 3 feedings per day
  • 1 teaspoon fruit, gradually increased to 1/4 to 1/2 cup in 2 to 3 feedings per day
  • 1 teaspoons vegetable, gradually increased to 1/4 to 1/2 cup in 2 to 3 feedings per day
  • Be sure to introduce new foods one at a time, to ensure your sweet babe is not allergic. Wait at least three days in between each new food.
  • Pureed or strained fruits to try include banana, pears, applesauce, peaches, apricots, plums, and avocado (yes, avocado is a fruit!).
  • Pureed or strained vegetables to try include well-cooked carrots, squash, sweet potato, green beans, and peas.
  • Always nurse or formula feed first before introducing solids.

9 to 12 Months

For Liquids (breast milk or formula)
  • 7-8 oz. about every 6 hours approximately 4 times a day (24-32 oz.)
For Solids (iron-fortified cereals, pureed or strained fruits and vegetables, small amounts of dairy products, finger foods, proteins, non-citrus juice)
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup dairy (or 1/2 oz. cheese) per day
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup iron-fortified cereal per day
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup fruit per day
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup vegetables per day
  • 1/8 to 1/4 cup protein foods per day
  • 3 to 4 oz. non-citrus juices per day
  • Start feeding in high chair.
  • Try using a cup for juice. Remember, juice doesn’t replace breast milk or formula. Non-citrus juices include apple or pear.
  • Feed only foods that will dissolve in baby’s mouth.
  • Dairy products suitable for baby include soft pasteurized cheese, yogurt, cottage cheese; no cow’s milk till 1 year.
  • Fruit and vegetables can now be cut into cubes or strips and fed to baby, as can purees and mashes. Vegetables should always be bite-sized and soft-cooked until tender.
  • Small amounts of proteins should be introduced. These can include egg, pureed meats and poultry as well as boneless fish. Tofu is also a great baby protein. Also try offering baby well-cooked and/or mashed beans with soft skins like lentils, split peas, pintos, black beans.
  • Finger foods include cut-up lightly-toasted bagel pieces, well-cooked piece pasta (no noodles), teething crackers, and low-sugar cereals.
  • It is also during the later of the months that combo foods can be given to baby. Try tasty treats like macaroni and cheese or casseroles.

12 to 18 Months

For Liquids
  • Approx 4 oz. cow’s/soy milk (or yogurt) up to 4 times a day.
  • You may continue to breastfeed as long as you and baby would like, baby will self-regulate amounts. Continue to introduce solids.
For Solids
  • Dairy: 4 daily servings; 1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
  • Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta: 6 daily servings; 1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
  • Fruit: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
  • Vegetables: 2 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
  • Protein: 2 daily servings; 1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg; 1/2 Cup Cooked Beans and Eggs
  • 3 to 4 oz. non-citrus juices per day
  • Give your child snacks at the table rather than letting them walk around grazing.
  • If your child hasn’t given up the bottle yet, now’s the time!
  • Your child can eat almost any food after age 1 as long as it’s in a form that’s safe for him, i.e. pureed or finely chopped – just no reduced-fat milks.
  • Your toddler will continue to show a heightened interest in self-feeding, first with fingers and then with utensils at around 15 to 18 months of age. Use every opportunity possible to practice the skills needed for self-feeding. Be sure to lend a hand when frustrations occur.

18 to 24 Months

For Liquids
  • Approx 12-20 oz. cow’s/soy milk per day.
  • You may continue to breastfeed as long as you and baby would like; baby will self-regulate amounts. Continue to introduce solids.
  • Your growing babe should have three to six cups of water per day including the water in breast milk, juices, whole milk and food. Supplement with drinking water.
For Solids
  • Dairy: 4 daily servings; 1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
  • Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta: 6 daily servings; 1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
  • Fruit: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
  • Vegetables: 2 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
  • Protein: 2 daily servings; 1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg; 1/2 Cup Cooked Beans
  • Offer your little love three meals and two or three snacks each day, but remember that it’s quite common for your 18-24 month old to skip meals. Skipping a meal may be a difficult concept for you, but children need to learn to listen to internal cues for hunger and fullness. Don’t be a pusher; allow a kid who’s not hungry to wait it out. Allowing children to eat on demand all day can be just as harmful.
  • Continue serving iron-fortified cereal until your child is 18 to 24 months old to ensure correct iron levels and counteract possible anemia.
  • Speak with your doctor if you’re considering giving your child a vitamin supplement.

24 Months+

For Liquids
  • Children should be given five to eight cups of water per day including the water in beverages and food. Make up for extra with drinking water. Liquids should include:
  • Milk
  • Juice
  • Water
For Solids
  • Dairy: 5 daily servings; 1/2 Cup; 3/4 Ounce Cheese
  • Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta: 7 daily servings; 1/2 Slice or 1/4 Cup
  • Fruit: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
  • Vegetables: 3 daily servings; 1/4 Cup Cooked; 1/2 Cup Raw
  • Protein: 2 daily servings; 1 Tablespoon; 1 Egg; 1/2 Cup Cooked Beans and Eggs
  • After your rapidly growing little one turns two, they can enjoy the same foods the rest of the family eats, just control portion size.
  • Continue to serve three meals per day with two optional snacks.
  • Offering your tot a balanced diet with minimum saturated fats and partially hydrogenated fat aids in developing the healthy eating habits later on.

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